Code Considerations For Various Types of Door Hardware

Most consumers never think twice when buying various types of door hardware but behind the scene, maintenance managers are responsible for ensuring that hardware manufactured and sold meet code standards. Typically, the manager would be involved with door hardware designed for commercial use although hardware used in apartments, condominiums, and other shared residential properties, as well as single-family dwellings is a part of this persons responsibility.

Whether door locks and handles are being purchased for a home or business, everything sold in the United States must meet strict guidelines for functionality. However, the exact codes vary somewhat between different states and municipalities. This means that codes established on a local, state, and federal level would be unique. As a part of this job, maintenance managers have a tough job in staying current on codes and industry standards but taking this job serious is what keeps people protected.

Because of growing concern in safety, applicable codes have become relatively complex. Of course, the top issues that door hardware codes address include safety, security, and accessibility. If the hardware manufactured for security purposes was sold without meeting mandated code standards, in addition to putting people in potential harms way, business and home intrusion due to faulty or inadequate locks cause insurance costs to skyrocket.

Keep in mind that along with standards and codes on a national level, managers must stay current on standards and codes as they relate to the National Fire Protection Agency, and the American National Standards Institute/International Code Council. However, another organization oversees standards and codes for various types of door hardware to include the American with Disabilities Acts. In this last case, people with certain disabilities need solutions for door knobs, handles, pulls, locks, etc so they can get in and out of doors the same as everyone else.

We wanted to provide a few of the standards and codes under the different organizations, and a brief comment about what those are.

• American National Standard for Accessible and Usable Buildings and Facilities (ANSI and ICC) – These door hardware standards and codes are specific to the state of Louisiana stating that codes must coordinate with rebuilding efforts after damage caused by hurricane.

• National Fire Protection (NFPA) – In this case, the organization is responsible for 80 standards and codes relating to fire doors and fire windows. Primarily, the organization makes sure that escape is possible during an emergency while keeping the property protected.

• Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) – For people living and working in certain parts of the country, high force hurricane winds are common. In this case, codes would apply not just for door hardware but materials of which doors could be made to withstand winds between 130 and 150 miles per hour.

• Access Guidelines for Buildings and Facilities (ADAAG) – The last organization we wanted to mention is this, which establishes and enforces guidelines specific to threshold height and door clearance limits, along with accessible door hardware to include pulls, knobs, handles, latches, locks, and other functioning mechanisms that would be shaped making them easy to grasp and operate with one hand.

Specific Pieces of Door Hardware

A number of different items may be meant by the term door hardware. These are essentially the mechanisms of a door – the accouterments that adorn a door in a functional sense, above and beyond its basic form (i.e. a rectangular piece of wood, metal, or other material in a frame). Let’s take a look at some of these common pieces of door hardware:

Basic Hardware

Locks and Latches

Door locks come in a huge variety and this variety gets even greater if you look at how they have evolved through time. The basic principle of most locks is a bolt of some sort. This bolt need only be some sort of bar, cylinder, lug, or other contrivance that extends from the swinging part of the door into some kind of receiving area on the frame. This simply stops the door from swinging open.

This basic idea leads to locks of all types – ordinary keyed locks, hand operated dead bolt locks, simple latched locks, and so on. These all employ this same sort of locking mechanism. Even the ordinary latch that is turned by the door handle and fits into the latch plate is a kind of bolt, and on many ordinary keyed locks the handle is prevented to from turning when the door is locked so that this latch or bolt stays where it is, holding the door shut.

Handles/Knobs

Handles are directly related to locks as noted above. Turning the handle generally makes the latch come out of the latch plate, allowing the door to open. Handles are often of the common circular shape or have some other form such as straight, bar-like handles and so on.

Hinges

Hinges are also an essential piece of door hardware. They, of course, allow the door to swing. They are mounted on one side of the door and on to the frame. Generally made of steel, brass, or some alloy, they need to be strong to support the weight of the door and to keep it swinging accurately and smoothly.

Additional Hardware

The foregoing are the main types of door hardware. These are all a door needs to function in a basic sense. There is, however, the possibility of adding other types of hardware to a door. For instance, one could conceivably add a door sweep at the bottom. This is most often a thin piece of aluminum with either a piece of rubber or a brush like fibers of some natural or synthetic material that prevent drafts from coming in under the door. These are very handy for drafty exterior doors and are often included with screen doors. They are usually screwed to the front of the door or otherwise affixed.

Other pieces of additional hardware common to find are racks and hooks. Racks and hooks allow items to be hung on the door. Like the other pieces of hardware mentioned, they come in all shapes and sizes. They are often purchased by the end user of the door and screwed into place.

Make the Barn Door Hardware Combo Part of Your Next New Home!

“Close that door! Were you born in a barn?” Have you heard this said to you when you were growing up? Kids tend not to close the doors when going in or out and adults are constantly saying this phrase to their kids. The barn has always been thought of as a place for animals to sleep-not humans. However, this concept is changing as the trend is going towards barn inspired homes and other buildings, like restaurants and hotels. A barn shaped home can look classy with the right hardware and doors, as well as the other accessories. You can find great barn doors and hardware from any reputable company, but especially from us. Here are some examples of what you can find when you shop with us.

Nylon Hardware and Stained Door Combo

Stained doors work well in either exterior or interior applications, as well as the nylon hardware. You can use stained doors with a variety of colors and finishes, and it still looks good. The nylon hardware is durable enough to last in any application, as well as quiet enough to use in a nursery or library. It can also work with many colors or finishes and still look classy enough for classic looks or rustic enough to fit in a rustic setting. If you put nylon hardware with other types of doors, you can create a very different look altogether for the design that you are looking for.

Bypass Hardware and Red Door Combo

Bypass hardware allows you to have three different doors in the same space, yet save space. Since the hardware is a dark-brown color, they would go well with our red barn door. You can use this combo in applications where there is a large space that does not lend itself well to traditional doors or frames. One reason you may want to use this barn door hardware combo is that you may have a large space that could use up to three doors at one time, but you do not want to have a bulky door entrance or a lot of walls. This is the perfect solution-just attach the hardware on the ceiling and doors, and you are done!

Industrial Hardware and Clear Coat Door Combo

An industrial hardware look goes well with our clear coat barn doors in many settings, including a clean and modern home theme. You can choose from several colors to match the décor of your rooms, or even the colors of the exterior of your home. The clear coat finish on the barn door matches well with the industrial hardware, because the wood is left in its natural state that creates a classic, yet modern look. Industrial flat tracks are heavy duty and can hold doors weighing up to 500 pounds! You can even use this hardware with steel or glass doors-creating any type of look you want.

New Home Design

When designing your home, you want to make sure you create a space that you are happy and comfortable in for years to come. While you may not want a traditional barn-like home, you can still incorporate sliding doors with our barn door hardware combo sets. Hanging doors take up less space, are quieter and take more abuse than traditional doors found in many houses and apartments today. A barn could be fun to design or live in, but there are many more applications that you can use a barn door hardware combo in besides a barn. Take time to use your imagination, and you may find that you will come up with a completely different home in the end.